LDS Teaching Helps for Elder Neil L. Andersen's "The Voice of the Lord"

"The Voice of the Lord" by Elder Neil L. Andersen focuses on how we need to apply General Conference into our lives. I love hearing examples of how others have done it and the way it blessed their lives. President Russell M. Nelson is such a great example. 

 
 

This is a great lesson to realize how great this change in focus of our 2nd and 3rd Sunday lessons really is. How blessed we are to study the lessons of the prophets regularly and to really make General Conference apart of our lives.


Questions

  • Is it hard to trust and believe the prophets in our world today? Why or why not?
  • Has anyone ever received a customized message at General Conference?
  • What has the Lord promised us if we study General Conference talks?
  • What do you appreciate about General Conference?
  • What answers or direction have you received because of General Conference?
  • How do you prepare yourself for General Conference?
  • What helps you study General Conference after the sessions are over? How do you study the talks?
  • What can we do to better make General Conference apart of our lives? 
  • What does the Lord want us to know right now?
  • What are you implementing (or have) from General Conference and how has it blessed your life?
  • How do you know the words you have heard at General Conference are true?
  • How can we light the world with General Conference?
  • How can we allow General Conference to be expressed in all we do?
  • Why does General Conference matter to you?

Teaching Thoughts

From the Church, "Perhaps members of your Relief Society or quorum could share an experience in which a general conference message felt particularly meaningful to them. Why were these messages meaningful? What does Elder Andersen teach about the significance of general conference messages and the effort and process involved in preparing them? How should this knowledge affect the urgency with which we study and heed these words? Consider making a list of invitations from the most recent conference. What have we done to act on these invitations?"

These are my ideas. My hope is that reading my thoughts will be a springboard to finding the right plans for your class. Remember you are leading a discussion, not teaching a lesson so you may only need one of these ideas.

  • Open up a discussion of how members of your class study General Conference talks: do they listen to them, read and highlight, look for blessings and promises to us, etc. Here are some suggestions on LDS.org.
  • Share the story of President Nelson's experience in China. How has Elder Nelson blessed lives because of counsel from prophets? How have we been blessed as we've followed recent counsel from  President Thomas S. Monson, the First Presidency, and the Quorum of the Twelve?
  • Split into groups and give them a few talks each. Ask each group to come up with one main theme for each talk. You can have them write down their answers on paper and hang it up on the board after so you can discuss them further.
  • Take a poll to kick off your class in a fun way. Write on the board before class, "How do you prefer to study General Conference?" with answers such as, "Ensign, Desktop, in the Gospel Library app, Audio, etc." Let people use the white board markers to vote. It really doesn't matter what you use (just use something!) but it can get some good conversation started.
  • Use my General Conference Discussions (for newsletter subscribers only- it's free) to break into groups or discuss each talk briefly. 
  • Bring a treasure chest with quotes from General Conference inside (you can use the ones I shared with newsletter subscribers or make your own with PicMonkey or Canva). Have different people draw from the chest, read a quote, then discuss it as a class. You can even make a chart of who said it, what we learn from it, how we can apply it, and why it matters.
  • Focus your discussion on some of the promised blessings we were given this past General Conference. 
  • You can use these Talk Summaries to easily review specific talks and discuss them.